The Challenge

We live in a land of opportunity. But too often our
destinies are written before we’re born.

Some of us will be born into the world with limitless possibilities.
We’ll be lucky enough to receive a quality education, establish
a promising career and chase our biggest dreams.

Some of us will be born into poverty and miss our shot at success.
We’ll have an unfair disadvantage from the moment we take
our first breath. The odds are against us graduating high school,
having a steady job or even knowing what it means to dream big.

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The Early Years Matter

During the first few years of a baby’s life, 1 million neural connections are formed in the brain every second. Babies’ brains are literally wired to learn—as much as they possibly can. And they are shaped by inputs from their environments—for better or for worse.

human-brain-development-chart

Vocabulary-Growth-Chart

The Achievement Gap Starts Early

Children who grow up in poverty face disadvantages that hamper healthy development. A gap in early vocabulary development between children in poverty and their higher-income peers is evident as early as 18 months of age. Research shows that these differences have lasting effects on a child’s academic success later in life.

Early Investments Pay Off

Fortunately, there’s a wide body of research that demonstrates that early childhood interventions, particularly in the first years of life, do work. With high‑quality early childhood experiences, people are more likely to have a higher income as adults, more likely to own a home, more likely to graduate from high school (on time)—and less likely to need special education or public aid.

Not only are early childhood programs good for children and families, they are good for our entire society. James Heckman, a Nobel Prize‑winning economist, found that every dollar invested in early childhood education produces a 7‑10% per annum return in better education, health, social and economic outcomes.

7‑10%

RETURN FOR EVERY DOLLAR INVESTED IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

4%

THE PERCENTAGE OF ELIGIBLE INFANTS AND TODDLERS SERVED BY EARLY HEAD START

More High‑Quality Programs Needed

While we know that high‑quality early childhood programs can give low‑income children a better chance to thrive, there aren’t enough quality programs to serve the 6 million children under age 5 living in poverty in this country.

Too many children enter kindergarten unprepared and struggle to catch up to their peers. They’re more likely to drop out of school and never go to college.

We believe opportunity should never be determined by the circumstances of our birth. Learn how Educare levels the playing field.

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